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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2020  |  Volume : 17  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 23-35

Effect of customized venipuncture nursing technique on selected responses and insertion difficulty among patients with blood disorders


Medical Surgical Nursing, Faculty of Nursing, Cairo University, Cairo, Egypt

Correspondence Address:
Safaa M Hassanein
Medical Surgical Nursing, Faculty of Nursing, Cairo University, Cairo
Egypt
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/ENJ.ENJ_17_20

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Background Peripheral intravenous access is one of the most commonly performed technical nursing procedures in hospitals, and it is mandatory for patients with blood disorders. Obtaining venous access is an essential first step in patient care. Peripheral intravenous success rates, rely heavily on clinician experience and patient physiology. Obtaining peripheral intravenous access may be difficult and cause patient anxiety, discomfort, and pain, and this may cause delays in patient management and employment of additional personnel, leading to lengthening of procedure times. Aim The aim was to evaluate the effect of a customized venipuncture nursing technique (CVNT) on selected responses and insertion difficulty among patients with blood disorders. Design: A quasi-experimental non-equivalent control group design was used. Research hypothesis: H1: The study group that received the CVNT will exhibit improvement in selected responses than the control group that received only routine hospital venipuncture. H2: The study group that received the CVNT will have a significant lower mean insertion difficulty score than the control group that received only routine hospital venipuncture. Patients and methods A total of 60 participants were included in the study (30 for the study group and 30 for the control group). The participants were selected using a simple random sampling technique. Five tools were used to gather data: first, demographic and medical data sheet; second, Beck anxiety inventory; third, numerical pain rating scale; fourth, Likert comfort scale; and fifth, insertion difficulty scale. Results The mean±SD age was 47.7±13.8 and 47.0±14.5 years and BMI was 23.5±1.2 and 23.4±1.2 among the study and control groups, respectively. There was statistical significant difference in needle insertion difficulty (before and after the procedure) among the study group who received CVNT; regarding respiration, pulse, and systolic blood pressure (49.2, 4.2, and 3.4, respectively, with P=0.000). There was a statistical significance difference between the study and the control groups regarding anxiety intensity, pain intensity, comfort, and measure difficulty, as one of the indicators of needle insertion difficulty, total scores, which were 2.9, 8.9, 12.8, and 15.3, respectively, with P value of 0.000. Conclusion Built on the current study findings, the researchers concluded that; CVNT was effective in reducing the pain, anxiety, and difficulty in needle insertion based on the measure difficulty indicator and promoted comfort of such patients during venipuncture. Also it enhanced selected patient parameters such as respiration, pulse, systolic blood pressure, thereby increasing patient comfort. Recommendation Nurses should consider the using of CVNT technique, and be conscious that; there is a need of having evidence-based protocols to care for patients with blood disorders.


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